Saturday, June 18, 2011

History of Womens Role in the Church

So to give some background about why this was written. It was for my Church History class, which is a random class for the subject of womens roles to come up. But during one of his lectures, my teacher mentioned almost as an afterthought that women were leaders in the early church. I felt the need to object and let the class know that my teacher was off. And, in response, I chose to do my oral presentation and end of the class term paper on The History of Womens Roles in the Church. Let me know what ya think!


Tim Wellings
11/30/10
The History of Womens roles within the Church

For the past two thousand years, the Church has been almost unanimous on this issue. There have always been people questioning the practice, but the Church has stood firm. It has only been in the last century or so that the Church has overturned her practice and gone against the word of God. I am talking of course of womens' roles within the Church. Before I get into it, I do want to stress that this is not a salvation issue, but one of sanctification. Yet while it is not a foundational doctrine, it is very important who God wants teaching His very word and His ways, and who He wants shepherding His people.

Laziness of the church and responses

The Question:

The disciples often had difficulty understanding Jesus because they already had an idea of who the “messiah” should be. Does this happen within the church today? What “political, social, or religious agendas from our culture have shaped how we understand Jesus’ kingdom?” (Burge p. 194, question 5).


My answer:

Heck yeah it happens in the church today! We may have inherited protestantism, a movement that stood up to the corruption of the church at the time, but we are now no different.

A glimpse of the African Church

This was from a fellow classmate of mine in NT Survey. Though I know there are many great things about the African church, here is a look at some of their struggles:


The Question:
The disciples often had difficulty understanding Jesus because they already had an idea of who the “messiah” should be. Does this happen within the church today? What “political, social, or religious agendas from our culture have shaped how we understand Jesus’ kingdom?” (Burge p. 194, question 5).

Response:
The disciples did have an expectation for a Messiah that they had "framed up" in their minds to suite their political, religious, and cultural perceptions.

It still happens today even within the Christian community.
Take for instance, Africa is a place where most cultures have generated a great fear and concern for activties regarding black magic, spell, witchcraft, charms, and potions.